Business Intelligence Blog from arcplan
9Mar/120

Big Data for Manufacturers: Customer Feedback Should Influence R&D

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In 2001, The McKinsey Global Institute published a comprehensive report on big data, Big Data: The Next Frontier for Innovation, Competition, and Productivity, which explores the value that companies across various industries may yield as result of the big data explosion. So far we’ve explored the impact of big data on retail and healthcare companies, but today I’ll explore how big data analytics impact the manufacturing industry.

The manufacturing sector stores more data than any other sector, according to the McKinsey report. Manufacturers will likely get the most benefit from big data analytics since they have so much “raw material” to work with (from machinery metrics to sales systems). Manufacturing is a relatively efficient industry, with many advances made over the last few decades to streamline processes and improve quality through management practices like lean & six sigma (and lean six sigma!). But big data can be the impetus for the next wave of improvements in manufacturing, especially in R&D.

Research and Development
Streamlining the R&D process results in greater efficiency and reduced costs for US manufacturers and is important for products to be competitive in the global economy. But in 2012 and beyond, manufacturers should be going further, leveraging big data to influence design decisions. This means incorporating customer feedback into the process, designing products and adding features that customers actually want. McKinsey calls this “design to value” or “value-driven design.”

Surveys: I’ve taken consumer surveys that ask questions like “How much more would you be willing to pay for x feature?” and I now understand why companies are asking this. They are culling data from consumers about what features are desired and if they are included in the product/service, what is the value, i.e. how much are people willing to pay for it. Gathering concrete insights is one step toward big data analytics influencing R&D. Manufacturers should be listening to what consumers want and refining their designs accordingly. It’s just smart business.

Here’s a concrete example: Domino’s Pizza. You might not think of Domino’s as a manufacturer, but it is – the company is a serious dough manufacturer, producing and distributing dough to more than 5,000 US stores.

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30Jan/121

Big Data in Retail – Big Ideas for Better Retailer Performance

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According to industry forecasts, the world’s volume of data doubles every 18 months, and all forms of enterprise data will grow 650% over the next five years. The talk around big data is more than marveling at the mass of information we’re creating. As analysts and data scientists, we’re trying to find the good stuff – the trends, the data that allows us to make better decisions now and in the future, to predict the moves that will make our business more successful down the line.

Big data (explained in our previous article here) might be new to you, but I’ve seen some analyst reports referencing big data ideas as far back as 2001. However, the BI world is talking about it more and more as data volumes grow and we begin to see the potential knowledge to be gained in these data sets.

So maybe you’re thinking, how can big data benefit my company? It’s hard to think conceptually about it, so let’s take a look at some concrete examples of how companies are using big data today. We’ll start with the retail industry. Keep in mind that many of these ideas can be used on a smaller scale for retailers of any size.

Wal-Mart sifts through massive amounts of unstructured social media and search data to find out what products consumers are talking about. They use that information to set their ad buying strategy on sites like Google, with the goal of competing for e-commerce sales – currently dominated by Amazon.com.

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17Jan/123

The Big Data Trend Explained: Big Data vs. Large Data

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Acquiring thorough insight into your data and tapping into the needs and buying patterns of customers are growing needs for businesses striving to increase operational efficiency and gain competitive advantage. Throughout 2011, I noticed a heightened interest in ‘big data’ and ‘big data analytics’ and the implications they have for businesses. In August, Gartner placed big data and extreme information processing on the initial rising slope of their Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies, so we’re just at the beginning of the big data trend. A recent TDWI survey reports that 34% of organizations are tapping into large data sets using advanced analytics tools with the goal of providing better business insight. The promise of big data analytics is that harnessing the wealth (and volume) of information within your business can significantly boost efficiency and increase your bottom line.

The term ‘big data’ is an all-inclusive term used to describe vast amounts of information. In contrast to traditional data which is typically stored in a relational database, big data varies in terms of volume, frequency, variety and value. Big data is characteristically generated in large volumes – on the order of terabytes or exabytes of data (one exabyte starts with 1 and has 18 zeros after it) per individual data set. Big data is also generated in high frequency, meaning that information is collected at frequent intervals. Additionally, big data is usually not nicely packaged in a spreadsheet or even a multidimensional database and often takes unstructured, qualitative information into account as well.

So where does all this data come from?

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21Dec/110

Happy Holidays!

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Thanks to our loyal readers for inspiring us to share ideas with you every week on this Business Intelligence Blog. We look forward to bringing you more great content in 2012. Here’s some of the ideas we’re cooking up:

  • A series on Big Data – the trend explained, and concrete ways big data can help your business outperform the competition
  • 10 Ways Out of BI Chaos
  • 5 Traps of Mobile BI
  • 10 Pieces of Advice for Better BI Reporting
  • More on the trend of BI in the cloud
  • …and more

Count on arcplan’s blog to keep you informed of the latest BI trends. Have a wonderful holiday season and Happy New Year! We’ll be back in January!