Business Intelligence Blog from arcplan
6Sep/110

More Dash Less Bored: How to Build Interactive, “Go-To” BI Dashboards

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Join arcplan this Thursday, September 8th at 2pm Eastern for More Dash Less Bored, a free webinar on the latest thinking in dashboard design, with practical tips for creating engaging dashboards that are widely adopted.


Sure, you have a dashboard, but when you have a question about company performance, is it the first place you go for answers? Do your executives still ask you to run custom reports? Has your dashboard lost its relevance in the time since it was built?

Your dashboard needs more dash and less bored. Attend this webinar to find out how to make your dashboard a definitive source of actionable, timely, and relevant information for ALL stakeholders in your company.

We’ll show you some of the latest thinking and best practices in dashboard design as well as dashboards you can emulate. This webinar is designed so that you take away practical information you can use now.

In this webinar, we’ll discuss:

  • The 5 characteristics of successful dashboards
  • Trends in dashboard design
  • Bad dashboards & “chart fouls”
  • How to choose the right chart type for your data
  • How to incorporate best practices into your existing dashboards

Join us to learn how to take your dashboards to the next level.

Date: Thursday, September 8
Time: 2:00 pm Eastern (New York City time zone)
Presenter: Dwight deVera, Senior Vice President
Register: Click here

In the meantime, check out our video on creating engaging dashboards with arcplan Enterprise:

21Jun/110

The Methodology for Calculating BI ROI (What’s Your BI ROI? – Part 3)

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Thanks for keeping track of our series on Business Intelligence ROI! So far we’ve evaluated the potential ROI of a new BI project and we’ve explored the top 5 BI projects that never pay off. Finally, today we’ll outline the methodology for calculating the actual ROI of your BI project. We can accomplish this by addressing specific phases in our Cost-Benefit Analysis.

  1. Choose a targeted return goal and state your definition of success. One of Steven Covey’s habits in his book entitled “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People” is to begin with the end in mind. Are you trying to reduce costs, avoid costs, or enhance profitability? State your goal so that you know what you’re working towards.
  2. List assumptions. Clearly state the specific assumptions being made in the Cost-Benefit Analysis. Provide documentation for the rationale or logic used in making this assumption and include any implications or risks involved. Yes, it’s a way of covering your bases, but more importantly it gives the project transparency.
  3. Resources. In this step, we are calculating costs from specific business units. We need to examine the current process and look at the resources that are currently involved. What is the hourly cost of your external consultants and analysts and how many working hours do they accumulate per week? The hourly rate and hours worked per work week will tell you what the project is costing you in terms of human resource allocation.
  4. Define the benefits in timeline format. How much time do your analysts or members of the management team spend loading data from a financial system, dealing with data load issues or generating reports? How often do you require external consultants or get visits from external auditors? Additionally, we must note the periodicity of these exercises. How often are these people in place? Monthly, quarterly or twice a year? And do you have daily reconciliations? If some of these tasks can be replaced, automated or accelerated by your BI solution, then you can calculate monthly savings and even a cumulative extended benefit in the future.

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