Business Intelligence Blog from arcplan
27Aug/120

The Pitfalls of Budgeting & Planning Deployments: Part II

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In Part 1 of this post, I outlined 2 pitfalls to avoid when deploying budgeting, planning and forecasting (BP&F) systems. Let’s follow up with 3 more rocks in the road to avoid on your way to project success:

3. The wrong team
Don’t be fooled into thinking that developers are the only ones needed to make your new planning system a reality. Your “dream team” should include project managers, functional experts, platform architects, data architects and of course, the project sponsor.

The project sponsor is instrumental in driving the approval of the project to begin with and stays involved during implementation (supporting the project manager, making decisions, ensuring the project continues to support the business’ priorities, managing relationships with stakeholders and the vendor). He or she is also pivotal once the project is complete. Overseeing adoption of the system may ultimately fall on this person. You could have the most perfect budgeting and planning solution ever developed, but if no one uses it, the project is a failure. It’s this person’s job to ensure that stakeholders understand and use the system as he/she is the one who identified the need for change and should be committed to seeing it through.

There are sometimes 2 project managers – one provided by the vendor and one from the client organization. The vendor’s project manager will steer the ship, be mindful of the scope of the project, communicate progress with stakeholders and ensure that the project is on time and on budget…

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22Aug/120

The Pitfalls of Budgeting & Planning Deployments: Part I

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The financial success of any organization begins with a well-structured budget for each department. Just having this budget/plan in place does not guarantee success, but not having a plan guarantees failure.

But with only half of organizations’ plans being accurate and two-thirds not being able to investigate the details of their budgets in real time, many companies are planning major modifications to their budgeting and planning because they are painfully aware of the shortcomings of their process.[1]

The implementation of a comprehensive budgeting, planning and forecasting (BP&F) tool should not be taken lightly. Though BP&F solution deployments can take as little as 6 weeks or as much as 4 months depending on the complexity, these projects require significant forethought, resources, and strategy. With this in mind, here are some pitfalls to avoid if at all possible. These of course apply to all business intelligence projects, not simply BP&F:

1) Unrealistic scope
An unrealistic scope is the #1 project impediment we see at arcplan. Because our solution, arcplan Edge, is fully customizable, we enable our customers to not compromise on their requirements. However, not every company has the funds to deploy every item on their wish list in Phase I of the project. So what can you do to ensure project success?

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26Jan/120

The 5 Traps of Mobile BI

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Mobile business intelligence is poised to skyrocket in 2012 and beyond. With up to 80% of users expected to access BI exclusively on their mobile device within 2 years*, mobile BI has become a critical part of many businesses’ IT strategy. As the desire for mobile BI grows, businesses are jumping rapidly into the pool – in some cases, without fully forming a long-term strategy or managing users’ expectations, which can lead to low adoption rates or ultimately project failure.

Businesses should avoid the following pitfalls as they dive into mobile BI deployments:

1) Expecting true feature parity. When users are introduced to mobile business intelligence, they may expect it to offer the feature richness they enjoy on their laptops or PCs. Unfortunately, mobile BI does not currently allow actions like “drag-and-drop,” so it will never be quite the same experience. To make up for this, mobile BI apps should leverage device-specific controls and gestures that allow for zooming in and out and should make use of large buttons and easy navigation to make the experience as user-friendly as possible. Preparing users to miss some features but embrace others is the way to ensure a smooth transition from desktop BI to mobile BI.

arcplan mobile BI2) Ignoring mobile design standards. Mobile device screen resolution necessitates BI application redesign – not always a full-scale redesign of an existing BI app, but at the very least adjustments to font sizes, charts, and buttons to accommodate a smaller screen size. In addition, an app for a smartphone will have different requirements than one for a tablet. While a 9- inch tablet can display an entire dashboard at once, a smartphone BI app should limit users to a list of reports that lead to individual charts. As mobile BI grows in popularity, we will undoubtedly see organizations design their dashboards and reports with mobile in mind, enabling even easier deployment.

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